A TRANSZATLANTI KAPCSOLATOKRÓL | TRANSATLANTIC ISSUES

Az euróválság, az iráni nukleáris program, a balkáni országok kérdése olyan problémák, melyek megoldása transzatlanti megközelítést igényel.

President Barack Obama, Herman Van Rompuy, President of the European Council, left, and José Manuel Barroso, President of the European Commission, right, deliver statements to the media following the EU Summit in the Roosevelt Room of the White House, Nov. 28, 2011. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

President Barack Obama, Herman Van Rompuy, President of the European Council, left, and José Manuel Barroso, President of the European Commission, right, deliver statements to the media following the EU Summit in the Roosevelt Room of the White House, Nov. 28, 2011. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

An EU Summit at the White House. Posted by Matt Compton on November 28, 2011

Today at the White House, President Obama met with a group of senior officials from the European Union. The focus of their talks was the global economy — though they also touched on the political transformation in the Middle East, Iran’s nuclear program, and steps necessary to ensure success in Afghanistan.

The leaders also issued a joint statement, describing their shared commitment to create jobs and ensure financial stability.

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In the News for the Wrong Reasons. Bruce Stokes, senior transatlantic fellow for economics at the German Marshall Fund of the United States. (European Voice) November 24, 2011

The real measure of the summit’s success, though, will be the willingness of both sides to commit themselves to reviving US-EU growth. With mounting public debt burdens and limited room for more monetary expansion, both Europe and the US need off-budget initiatives to revive investor and consumer confidence.

A New Transatlantic Approach for the Western Balkans . Time for A New Transatlantic Approach for the Western Balkans-coverChange in Serbia, Kosova, and Bosnia-Hercegovina. By Janusz Bugajski, Heather A. Conley. CSIS, Nov 21, 2011

Based on extensive interviews and discussions with policy makers and analysts in Sarajevo, Banja Luka, Belgrade, Prishtina, Brussels, and Washington, this report offers recommendations to American and European policymakers for a new transatlantic paradigm for two of the most significant challenges in the Western Balkans, Bosnia-Hercegovina as well as Serbia and Kosova. While it reflects on current and at times opposing U.S. and EU assistance strategies toward development and democratic reform, the report recommends a new, twenty-first century, transatlantic policy playbook for the Western Balkans infused with a realistic and long-term vision for the region.

Inaction is not an Option in Iran. GMF Blog, posted on 16 November 2011.

In the view of many experts, the Iranian program is advancing dangerously close to breakout capability. Iran has long had ample delivery devices for a nuclear weapon in the form of a relatively advanced ballistic missile capability. The IAEA report details Iran’s progress in developing a detonation capability, and Iran already possesses almost 5,000 kilograms of low-enriched uranium. According to David Albright of the Institute for Science and International Security, this amount, if enriched further, is sufficient for four nuclear weapons. Albright assesses that once Iran moves to enrich fuel to weapons grade, it could reach breakout capability in only six months. The question now is whether and how the United States and Europe will respond.

The American-Western European Values Gap. Pew Global Attitudes Project. November 17, 2011.

As has long been the case, American values differ from those of Western Europeans in many important ways. Most notably, a new survey by the Pew Research Center’s Global Attitudes Project finds that Americans are more individualistic and are less supportive of a strong safety net than are the publics of Spain, Britain, France and Germany.

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